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Sailor Fails Navy SEAL Test, Sets Fire to Billion Dollar Assault Ship

Ryan Sawyer Mays, a butthurt 20-year-old sailor who failed his US Navy SEAL test, has been accused of setting fire to an assault ship.

Rage Quit


For many gamers out there, rage quitting has often involved throwing a console controller on the ground or swearing into a headset. But when you’re in the Navy, the stakes are a little higher.


Take Ryan Sawyer Mays, a 20-year-old sailor who failed his US Navy SEAL test and then allegedly set fire to a $1.2 billion amphibious assault ship, costing the Navy $30 million in damage, .


According to documents obtained by the Beast, Mays is accused of lighting up the USS Bonhomme Richard, a 40,000-ton, 843-foot assault vessel, in July 2020.


The fire burned for nearly five days and injured dozens of sailors who attempted to extinguish the massive flames, . The ship was also subsequently scrapped, though it’s unclear whether Mays’ damage had anything to do with that.


Prime Suspect


The US Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) interviewed 177 sailors who were assigned to the ship at the time. One sailor reported to have seen a person in overalls and a face mask carrying a mysterious bucket into a lower level at the rear of the ship.


The sailor later affirmed that he was “fairly sure” it was Mays, according to the Beast, noting that he had also said that he “hates” the US Navy. The interviewed sailor also suspected it was Mays because he heard him say “I love deck,” a phrase he apparently said often.


Mays was reportedly frustrated after being reassigned to the ship as an “undesignated Seaman” despite wanting to become a Navy SEAL.


“According to Navy leadership, the morale and behavior of sailors who had aspired to become a SEAL, and then find themselves serving in a more traditional role on a Navy ship, are frequently very challenging,” a search warrant affidavit reads, as quoted by The Daily Beast.


The USS Bonhomme Richard will be scrapped, according to a due to estimated repair costs tallying up to $3.2 billion — more than twice the amount the ship cost to build back in 1998.


READ MORE: [The Daily Beast]


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